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What is the Value of Gold Leaf?

There is no doubt we are in a recession. We see the cost of goods, services, and everything in between increasing by an exorbitant amount (seemingly non-stop) as the dollar value continues dropping.

We know of a few things that retain value during a recession, and one them is gold. A quick look at a gold price chart, along with our understanding of how and why gold is still so highly-valued , will confirm this fact. This is true for all forms of gold, whether it be a gold bullion, gold jewelry, gold statues, and even gold leaf.

23K-TPL-Loose

Gold is currently around $2,400–the highest it has ever been, and that number is projected to continue climbing as we face a continuing recession. Gold leaf is no exception, and those that regularly use this product know very well how quickly prices have changed.

What is the value of gold leaf? The material value of gold leaf comes from the manufacturing process, import costs and/or production costs (depending on the source), and safe storage. This is why gold leaf is roughly twice as expensive as gold of the same weight on its own, but what about its value when gold leaf is used?

Buddha Head Statue gilded in 23K Gold from L.A. Gold Leaf

Assuming the person gilding the gold leaf knows how to handle the delicate material, intentional gilding will increase the value of a gilded piece of work. This work will retain its value far past our lifetimes, especially if well-executed (of course, unless the gold is used on consumable goods like food or drinks). Keeping in mind the continuous increase in gold every year, the earlier someone buys gold, the larger increase in value one can obtain as time goes on. In short, it’s an investment.

Monetary value aside, gold leaf has a beautiful visual aesthetic that simply can’t be replaced. Many well-known artists use gold leaf to accent their works, such as Gustav Klimt’s (contemporary artist from late 19th to the early 20th century) “The Kiss” (“Der Kuss”), also known as “The Lovers” (Liebespaar).

Of course, we can’t forget the appeal of gold-covered gourmet dishes and drinks, which can be said to take advantage of both its monetary and aesthetic value, which is certainly true for baked goods. Most chefs and bakers use gold leaf as the visual “cherry on top”, rather than a means to increase the cost to a customer.

To conclude this short post, not only does gold leaf have a reliable monetary value, but a high aesthetic value as well.